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2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine goes to study on Circadian Rhythm

2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine goes to study on Circadian Rhythm

2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine goes to study on Circadian Rhythm

Joint Winners – Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael W. Young for their discoveries of molecular mechanisms controlling the circadian rhythm

Summary

Life on Earth is adapted to the rotation of our planet. For many years we have known that living organisms, including humans, have an internal, biological clock that helps them anticipate and adapt to the regular rhythm of the day. But how does this clock actually work? Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael W. Young were able to peek inside our biological clock and elucidate its inner workings. Their discoveries explain how plants, animals and humans adapt their biological rhythm so that it is synchronized with the Earth’s revolutions.

Using fruit flies as a model organism, this year’s Nobel laureates isolated a gene that controls the normal daily biological rhythm. They showed that this gene encodes a protein that accumulates in the cell during the night, and is then degraded during the day. Subsequently, they identified additional protein components of this machinery, exposing the mechanism governing the self-sustaining clockwork inside the cell. We now recognize that biological clocks function by the same principles in cells of other multicellular organisms, including humans.

With exquisite precision, our inner clock adapts our physiology to the dramatically different phases of the day. The clock regulates critical functions such as behavior, hormone levels, sleep, body temperature and metabolism. Our wellbeing is affected when there is a temporary mismatch between our external environment and this internal biological clock, for example when we travel across several time zones and experience “jet lag”. There are also indications that chronic misalignment between our lifestyle and the rhythm dictated by our inner timekeeper is associated with increased risk for various diseases.

Our inner clock

Most living organisms anticipate and adapt to daily changes in the environment. During the 18th century, the astronomer Jean Jacques d’Ortous de Mairan studied mimosa plants, and found that the leaves opened towards the sun during daytime and closed at dusk. He wondered what would happen if the plant was placed in constant darkness. He found that independent of daily sunlight the leaves continued to follow their normal daily oscillation (Figure 1). Plants seemed to have their own biological clock.

Other researchers found that not only plants, but also animals and humans, have a biological clock that helps to prepare our physiology for the fluctuations of the day. This regular adaptation is referred to as the circadianrhythm, originating from the Latin words circa meaning “around” and diesmeaning “day”. But just how our internal circadian biological clock worked remained a mystery.

Identification of a clock gene

During the 1970’s, Seymour Benzer and his student Ronald Konopka asked whether it would be possible to identify genes that control the circadian rhythm in fruit flies. They demonstrated that mutations in an unknown gene disrupted the circadian clock of flies. They named this gene period. But how could this gene influence the circadian rhythm?

This year’s Nobel Laureates, who were also studying fruit flies, aimed to discover how the clock actually works. In 1984, Jeffrey Hall and Michael Rosbash, working in close collaboration at Brandeis University in Boston, and Michael Young at the Rockefeller University in New York, succeeded in isolating the period gene. Jeffrey Hall and Michael Rosbash then went on to discover that PER, the protein encoded by period, accumulated during the night and was degraded during the day. Thus, PER protein levels oscillate over a 24-hour cycle, in synchrony with the circadian rhythm

A self-regulating clockwork mechanism

The next key goal was to understand how such circadian oscillations could be generated and sustained. Jeffrey Hall and Michael Rosbash hypothesized that the PER protein blocked the activity of the period gene. They reasoned that by an inhibitory feedback loop, PER protein could prevent its own synthesis and thereby regulate its own level in a continuous, cyclic rhythm

The model was tantalizing, but a few pieces of the puzzle were missing. To block the activity of the period gene, PER protein, which is produced in the cytoplasm, would have to reach the cell nucleus, where the genetic material is located. Jeffrey Hall and Michael Rosbash had shown that PER protein builds up in the nucleus during night, but how did it get there? In 1994 Michael Young discovered a second clock gene, timeless, encoding the TIM protein that was required for a normal circadian rhythm. In elegant work, he showed that when TIM bound to PER, the two proteins were able to enter the cell nucleus where they blocked period gene activity to close the inhibitory feedback loop

Such a regulatory feedback mechanism explained how this oscillation of cellular protein levels emerged, but questions lingered. What controlled the frequency of the oscillations? Michael Young identified yet another gene, doubletime, encoding the DBT protein that delayed the accumulation of the PER protein. This provided insight into how an oscillation is adjusted to more closely match a 24-hour cycle.

The paradigm-shifting discoveries by the laureates established key mechanistic principles for the biological clock. During the following years other molecular components of the clockwork mechanism were elucidated, explaining its stability and function. For example, this year’s laureates identified additional proteins required for the activation of the period gene, as well as for the mechanism by which light can synchronize the clock.

Keeping time on our human physiology

The biological clock is involved in many aspects of our complex physiology. We now know that all multicellular organisms, including humans, utilize a similar mechanism to control circadian rhythms. A large proportion of our genes are regulated by the biological clock and, consequently, a carefully calibrated circadian rhythm adapts our physiology to the different phases of the day (Figure 3). Since the seminal discoveries by the three laureates, circadian biology has developed into a vast and highly dynamic research field, with implications for our health and wellbeing.

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Gove says Brexit will boost exports of pigs’ ears

CONSERVATIVE PARTY CONFERENCE: Gove says Brexit will boost exports of pigs' ears

CONSERVATIVE PARTY CONFERENCE: Gove says Brexit will boost exports of pigs’ ears

Michael Gove, the environment secretary, has told a fringe meeting at the Conservative conference that Britain will be able export more pigs’ ears after Brexit. As the Press Association reports, he said leaving the EU would enable UK farmers to do away with ear tags and introduce their own “traceability methods” on livestock.

“There are some cuts of the animal that are hugely popular with the British consumer, others a little less. But some of those cuts are hugely popular elsewhere, say, for example, pigs’ ears are a delicacy in China”

Gove explained that “one of the reasons” why Britain has not been “as successful as we might have been at selling pigs’ ears to China is that EU rules dictate that pigs, like all livestock, have ear tags”. After Brexit these rules would not apply, he said.

“And as a result we can have pigs’ ears that don’t need to be pierced. Unpierced pigs’ ears are worth more.

We will have a fair, competitive advantage – we can sell more pigs’ ears to China and that means there can be more bacon and pork and ham from the other joints of the animal that are popularly sold here.

So by selling more sows’ ears to China we can buy more silk purses for British farmers”

 

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 United States: Extremism & the Failure to Condemn It Weakens Democracy 

USA: Extremism & the Failure to Condemn It Weakens Democracy

 United States: Extremism & the Failure to Condemn It Weakens Democracy 

Washington  –  August 16, 2017 —  In response to demonstrations by white supremacist groups, the violence in Charlottesville, VA, and President Trump’s equating neo-Nazis with demonstrators protesting racism, Freedom House issued the following statement:

“Extremism, the failure to recognize it, and the failure to unambiguously condemn it are threats to our democracy,” said Michael J. Abramowitz, president of Freedom House. “Our government, including the president, should display no tolerance for white supremacists, neo-Nazis, and other proponents of hate and bigotry. The success of our democracy depends on restraint and on respect for norms by leaders — and that has been lacking. If the United States is to live up to its principles, and to inspire other nations, our leaders must not fail to denounce those who espouse hatred.”

The United States is rated Free in Freedom in the World 2017, Free in Freedom of the Press 2017, and Free in Freedom on the Net 2016.

 

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Red Pill – Yemeni Cholera Epidemic & Taylor Swift Groping Case

Yemeni Cholera Epidemic & Taylor Swift Groping Case

Yemeni Cholera Epidemic & Taylor Swift Groping Case – Cholera count reaches half-a-million in Yemen & Taylor SWIFT wins one Dollar & a victory for women’s rights!

14 AUGUST 2017 | GENEVA – The total number of suspected cholera cases in Yemen this year hit the half a million mark on Sunday, and nearly 2000 people have died since the outbreak began to spread rapidly at the end of April.

The overall caseload nationwide has declined since early July, particularly in the worst affected areas. But suspected cases of the deadly waterborne disease continue to rage across the country, infecting an estimated 5000 people per day.

The spread of cholera has slowed significantly in some areas compared to peak levels but the disease is still spreading fast in more recently affected districts, which are recording large numbers of cases.

Yemen’s cholera epidemic, currently the largest in the world, has spread rapidly due to deteriorating hygiene and sanitation conditions and disruptions to the water supply across the country. Millions of people are cut off from clean water, and waste collection has ceased in major cities.

A collapsing health system is struggling to cope, with more than half of all health facilities closed due to damage, destruction or lack of funds. Shortages in medicines and supplies are persistent and widespread and 30 000 critical health workers have not been paid salaries in nearly a year.

“Yemen’s health workers are operating in impossible conditions. Thousands of people are sick, but there are not enough hospitals, not enough medicines, not enough clean water. These doctors and nurses are the backbone of the health response – without them we can do nothing in Yemen. They must be paid their wages so that they can continue to save lives,” said Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General.

WHO and partners are working around the clock to set up cholera treatment clinics, rehabilitate health facilities, deliver medical supplies, and support the national health response effort.

More than 99% of people sick with suspected cholera who can access health services are surviving. Furthermore, nearly 15 million people are unable to get basic healthcare.

MEANWHILE: Taylor Swift Wins $1 and a Victory for Women’s Rights

(CNN)After nearly four hours of deliberation, a jury ruled in favor of pop star Taylor Swift in her countersuit against former radio host David Mueller for alleged assault and battery.

Swift accused Mueller of groping her at a meet-and-greet event in June 2013. He will be required to pay $1 in damages to Swift.
The jury, comprised of six women and two men, also found the singer’s mother, Andrea Swift, not liable for tortious interference.
After the reading of the verdict, Swift embraced her mother.

In a statement, Swift thanked the judge and her legal team for “fighting for me and anyone who feels silenced by a sexual assault.”
“I acknowledge the privilege that I benefit from in life, in society and in my ability to shoulder the enormous cost of defending myself in a trial like this,” Swift added in the statement, obtained by CNN. “My hope is to help those whose voices should also be heard. Therefore, I will be making donations in the near future to multiple organizations that help sexual assault victims defend themselves.”

Mueller had sued Swift, the singer’s mom Andrea Swift, and radio promotions director Frank Bell in 2015, accusing them of interfering with his $150,000/year contract as a local morning radio DJ in Denver by pressuring his employer, KYGO radio, to fire him.
Bell was also found not liable for tortious interference.

Swift was dismissed as a defendant in Mueller’s suit on Friday after a judge ruled that there was insufficient evidence to show that Swift had acted improperly.

Swift’s lawsuit against Mueller argued that the trial would “serve as an example to other women who may resist publicly reliving similar outrageous and humiliating acts.”

After the verdict, Swift’s attorney, Doug Baldridge, said the ruling was “not just a win” but “something that can make a difference.”
“It takes people like Taylor, wonderful people like Taylor, who we all know, to stand up and draw these lines,” he told the press.
He added: “As I said in the closing [argument], that dollar, that single dollar, is of immeasurable value in this ever going fight to figure out where the lines are, what’s right and what’s wrong.”

 

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Blue Pill – Taylor Swift Groping Case & Yemeni Cholera Epidemic

Taylor Swift Groping Case & Yemeni Cholera Epidemic

Taylor Swift Groping Case & Yemeni Cholera Epidemic Exceeds Half-a-Million

(CNN)After nearly four hours of deliberation, a jury ruled in favor of pop star Taylor Swift in her countersuit against former radio host David Mueller for alleged assault and battery.

Swift accused Mueller of groping her at a meet-and-greet event in June 2013. He will be required to pay $1 in damages to Swift.
The jury, comprised of six women and two men, also found the singer’s mother, Andrea Swift, not liable for tortious interference.
After the reading of the verdict, Swift embraced her mother.

In a statement, Swift thanked the judge and her legal team for “fighting for me and anyone who feels silenced by a sexual assault.”
“I acknowledge the privilege that I benefit from in life, in society and in my ability to shoulder the enormous cost of defending myself in a trial like this,” Swift added in the statement, obtained by CNN. “My hope is to help those whose voices should also be heard. Therefore, I will be making donations in the near future to multiple organizations that help sexual assault victims defend themselves.”

Mueller had sued Swift, the singer’s mom Andrea Swift, and radio promotions director Frank Bell in 2015, accusing them of interfering with his $150,000/year contract as a local morning radio DJ in Denver by pressuring his employer, KYGO radio, to fire him.
Bell was also found not liable for tortious interference.

Swift was dismissed as a defendant in Mueller’s suit on Friday after a judge ruled that there was insufficient evidence to show that Swift had acted improperly.

Swift’s lawsuit against Mueller argued that the trial would “serve as an example to other women who may resist publicly reliving similar outrageous and humiliating acts.”

After the verdict, Swift’s attorney, Doug Baldridge, said the ruling was “not just a win” but “something that can make a difference.”
“It takes people like Taylor, wonderful people like Taylor, who we all know, to stand up and draw these lines,” he told the press.
He added: “As I said in the closing [argument], that dollar, that single dollar, is of immeasurable value in this ever going fight to figure out where the lines are, what’s right and what’s wrong.”

MEANWHILE: Cholera count reaches 500 000 in Yemen

14 AUGUST 2017 | GENEVA – The total number of suspected cholera cases in Yemen this year hit the half a million mark on Sunday, and nearly 2000 people have died since the outbreak began to spread rapidly at the end of April.

The overall caseload nationwide has declined since early July, particularly in the worst affected areas. But suspected cases of the deadly waterborne disease continue to rage across the country, infecting an estimated 5000 people per day.

The spread of cholera has slowed significantly in some areas compared to peak levels but the disease is still spreading fast in more recently affected districts, which are recording large numbers of cases.

Yemen’s cholera epidemic, currently the largest in the world, has spread rapidly due to deteriorating hygiene and sanitation conditions and disruptions to the water supply across the country. Millions of people are cut off from clean water, and waste collection has ceased in major cities.

A collapsing health system is struggling to cope, with more than half of all health facilities closed due to damage, destruction or lack of funds. Shortages in medicines and supplies are persistent and widespread and 30 000 critical health workers have not been paid salaries in nearly a year.

“Yemen’s health workers are operating in impossible conditions. Thousands of people are sick, but there are not enough hospitals, not enough medicines, not enough clean water. These doctors and nurses are the backbone of the health response – without them we can do nothing in Yemen. They must be paid their wages so that they can continue to save lives,” said Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General.

WHO and partners are working around the clock to set up cholera treatment clinics, rehabilitate health facilities, deliver medical supplies, and support the national health response effort.

More than 99% of people sick with suspected cholera who can access health services are surviving. Furthermore, nearly 15 million people are unable to get basic healthcare.

 

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What They’re NOT Telling You About The Charlottesville Race Riots

What They're NOT Telling You About The Charlottesville Race Riots

The Charlottesville Race Riots are the culmination of more than a billion dollars of funding by George Soros to purposefully foment racial division, with the intent of using the manufactured conflicts to take away US citizens’ rights

And it is mainstream media (MSM) that is at fault for collectively rounding on Trump and calling him racist because he hasn’t publicly denounced the so-called ‘Alt-Right’. So argues Alex Jones, the driving force behind INFOWARS, which has been a steadfast supporter of Trump since the early Republican primaries

Read and view more on the INFOWARS website for a better overview of Alex’s arguments

What do you think? Does Alex have a point?

 

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BROADCASTING HOUSE | NEWS FROM THE RIGHT | 2017-08-01

BROADCASTING HOUSE | NEWS FROM THE RIGHT | 2017-08-01

BROADCASTING HOUSE | NEWS FROM THE RIGHT | 2017-08-01

Burkini Debate Re-emerges | Facebook AI Experiment Shut Down After Computers Develop own Language | Jared Kushner – Trump election team ‘couldn’t even collude with local offices’ let alone Russia | Ryanair Pipe Bomb | Wikileaks Macron Emails | Hamza Bin Laden | New EU Border Checks Infuriate Britons | Sydney Terrorist Arrests | Breastfeeding Lessons for Eleven Year Olds | Jeremy Hunt says NHS needs more than Money | RBS Overdraft at 800% | Hammond Slapped down over Norway-style Brexit | Statins for all Men at 60 | JK Rowling Refuses to Apologize to Trump

 

British family left ‘humiliated’ after ‘apartment worker orders them out of their private swimming pool because their burkinis are against Portuguese culture’

  • Maryya Dean and sister-in-law suffered alleged slur while in Albufeira, Portugal
  • Worker made Ms Dean’s daughter stand up to show example of correct attire
  • Ms Dean said family were made to perform ‘walk of shame’ back to apartment

Facebook shuts down controversial chatbot experiment after AIs develop their own language to talk to each other

  • Facebook’s AI researchers were teaching chatbots how to negotiate
  • The bots were left unsupervised and developed their own machine language
  • The new language was more efficient for communication between the bots
  • Facebook says it wanted to develop bots to converse with people

MAIL EXCLUSIVE – The last supper: The Mooch dines at the Trump hotel in DC as he waves goodbye to his life as White House communications chief – hours after being fired and marched out just 10 days into his new job

  • Anthony Scaramucci was spotted dining at Trump Hotel’s BLT Prime in Washington DC on Monday night
  • He visited the restaurant just hours after he was sacked by President Trump as communications director
  • He spent most of the dinner on his cell phone and barely touched his food
  • Scaramucci had unleashed a profanity-laced tirade against resigned chief of staff Reince Priebus and Steve Bannon last week
  • He called Priebus a ‘f****** paranoid schizophrenic’ and accused Steve Bannon of ‘sucking his own c***’ in comments that appeared in the New Yorker
  • The Mooch took over as communication director just last week
  • Monday was the first day for new chief of staff Gen. John Kelly, who was behind the purge
  • Scaramucci was seen in an animated conversation with counselor to the president Kellyanne Conway early Monday afternoon
  • Trump claimed there was ‘No WH chaos’ in a tweet Monday morning

Did Melania and Ivanka knife the Mooch over his language? New claims his ‘c**k blocking’ tirade may have cost him his job

  • White House communications director Anthony Scaramucci lost his job Monday after just 10 days in the White House
  • President Trump found Scaramucci’s profane tirade ‘inappropriate’ as new chief of staff John Kelly seized control of the staff on his first full day on the job
  • There were a ‘wave of leaks’ Monday that first lady Melania Trump and Ivanka Trump were angry about Scaramucci’s language

‘I guess he wouldn’t do the fandango’: Twitter explodes with jokes at Scaramucci’s expense after his brief but memorable tenure in White House

  • White House comms director Anthony Scaramucci sacked by Trump Monday
  • Comes 10 days after his appointment and memorable tenure in the role
  • ‘The Mooch’ was divorced, gave profanity-laced interview and engineered the firing of chief of staff Reince Priebus all in the span of a couple days
  • Now Twitter users, especially liberals, react to the turmoil with cruel glee

General Kelly is in charge: Now Bannon, Kellyanne, Jared and even Ivanka will report to new chief of staff and NOT to the president following White House shakeup

  • First daughter, her husband won’t work directly for President Trump anymore
  • New chief of staff Gen. John Kelly establishing a military-like chain of command
  • Same will be true for Steve Bannon and Kellyanne Conway, the duo most responsible for getting Trump elected
  • ‘Everybody at the White House’ will report to Kelly, the press secretary said

Jared Kushner tells interns that the Trump election team ‘couldn’t even collude with local offices’ let alone Russia

  • Jared Kushner gave private talk as part of Congressional Intern Lecture Series
  • He told Congressional interns that Donald Trump’s election team could not have colluded with Russia because they ‘couldn’t even collude with our local offices’
  • He also said: ‘I’m a lot more comfortable talking to you guys today ’cause there isn’t any press’
  • Intern director warned the attendees not to leak contents of the talk to press
  • One source gave a copy of written notes from Kushner’s talk to magazine Foreign Policy

Air passenger ‘attempted to smuggle working pipe bomb onto Ryanair flight from Manchester to Bergamo but was let go because police didn’t realise it was a working explosive’

  • Nadeem Muhammad was attempting to board a flight from Manchester Airport
  • Security officers found a bomb made from batteries, tape, a marker pen and pins
  • He was let go by security because ‘nobody realised’ it was a ‘real device’

E-mail leaks reveal French think Britain is ‘too important’ to sideline after Brexit because of its strong military and plan to work more closely with Germany is flawed

  • Report sent to Macron suggests UK is ‘the most important’ EU nation for defence
  • It was among 20,000 of the French Presidents emails published by Wikileaks

Osama bin Laden’s son criticises Saudi royal family in campaign to become new al-Qaeda leader and overtake ISIS as world’s most feared terror group

  • Osama bin Laden’s son Hamza is reportedly set to be the next face of al Qaeda
  • The ‘poster kid’ for the terror organisation issued a chilling threat to royal family
  • The 28-year-old is now looking for revenge and to ‘avenge his father’s death’

New EU border checks insisted on by Brussels leave furious British holidaymakers queuing for up to FOUR hours at main European airports

  • Tourists told to expect queues at airports such as Paris, Madrid, Lisbon and Milan
  • Checks imposed on entry and exit, with some travellers missing flights as result
  • Issues follow introduction of EU rules tightening controls within Schengen area

Chancellor becomes first minister to visit Argentina in 16 years: Hammond told to stand up for the Falklands ahead of talks with the President

  • Philip Hammond will travel to Buenos Aires to meet president Mauricio Macri
  • No British Cabinet minister has visited Argentina since Tony Blair in 2001
  • Tensions have cooled under Mr Macri and his more liberal Falklands stance

Pictured: Bulldogs fan who ‘planned to blow up 500 passengers on Sydney flight’ arrested in terror raids after tip-off from foreign spy agencies – as it’s revealed his son ‘mixes’ with pilots

  • Four men were arrested in dramatic raids in Sydney on Saturday afternoon
  • They have been named in reports as fathers and sons Khaled and Mahmoud Khayat and Khaled and Abdul Merhi
  • They are accused of plotting to bring down a plane using a homemade bomb
  • Target ‘was Etihad flight to Abu Dhabi with 500 passengers and crew on board’
  • The alleged plot is believed to involve crude device disguised as a meat grinder
  • Foreign intelligence intercepted communication from Syria, prompting raids

Breastfeeding lessons at 11: Top doctors say it should be taught in school to make the practice more widespread

  • At 0.5 per cent Britain has the lowest rate of women breastfeeding after a year
  • This is significantly less than the 23 per cent in Germany and Brazil’s 56 per cent
  • Leading doctors say children need to be taught the basics in secondary school
  • Breastfeeding has benefits for mother and child and is known to stop infections

We can’t fix the NHS simply by throwing cash at it, says Hunt: Health Secretary admits his plans have resulted in ballooning costs for taxpayers

  • Jeremy Hunt admitted yesterday that throwing money at the NHS could fail
  • The Health Secretary said parties had ‘made the mistake’ of often adding cash
  • He bemoaned how cash was spent without a strategy by previous governments
  • He also announced plans to hire an extra 21,000 mental health care workers

RBS’s 800% interest for 16 days in the red: Bank named as having the most expensive unarranged overdraft as watchdog threatens to ban rip-off fees

  • FCA warned rip off overdraft fees pose a risk to vulnerable customers
  • The unauthorised overdraft charges are ‘high, complex and potentially harmful’
  • Overdraft fees generate £1.2billion of annual revenue for banks

No10 slaps down Hammond over call for a Norway-style Brexit transition and says free movement WILL end in 2019 amid Cabinet infighting over shape of deal with Brussels

  • Fresh signs of Cabinet tensions over shape of deal that they want with Brussels
  • No10 insisted UK is not seeking ‘off the shelf’ transition despite Hammond’s hints
  • Chancellor also said there’s ‘no plan’ to slash regulation or taxes after leaving EU

Give statins to ALL men at 60 and women from 75: Harvard experts say drug is vital to saving lives

  • Major study claims almost 12m people in England should be taking the pills
  • But 6.3m are not using the drugs – even though they are thought to be at high risk
  • ‘290,000 heart attacks and strokes could be avoided’ if all eligible took the pills

JK Rowling apologizes to family of disabled boy but REFUSES to say sorry to Trump for falsely saying the President refused to shake his hand after outrage led by Piers Morgan

  • JK Rowling apologized to the family of a disabled boy on Monday afternoon
  • The author blasted Trump on Twitter for avoiding the boy at a press conference
  • Edited video clip shared on Twitter appeared to show Trump skipping the child
  • A longer clip was released later that showed Trump did not pass over the boy
  • Piers Morgan and others called Rowling out for her tweets, requesting she delete them and apologize
  • Rowling eventually did apologize to the family and deleted her initial tweets
  • However, the British author has still not apologized to Trump for her accusations

PIERS MORGAN: JK Rowling’s disabled boy slur against Trump and her refusal to withdraw it proves that self-appointed High Priestess of Honesty is actually the lying Queen of Hypocrisy

 

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BROADCASTING HOUSE | News From the Left | 2017-08-01

BROADCASTING HOUSE | News From the Left | 2017-08-01

BROADCASTING HOUSE | News From the Left | 2017-08-01

Scaramucci Does the FandanGo | The White House ‘Dirty Dozen’ | Nicky Morgan requests assessment of City’s readiness for hard Brexit | Unsecured consumer credit tops £200bn for first time since 2008 | Grenfell fire inquiry may have to suspend work if CPS brings charges | Suicides of nearly 60,000 Indian farmers linked to climate change, study claims | UK urges tech giants to do more to prevent spread of extremism | Brexit weekly briefing: while May’s away, the cabinet fray | Sydney counter-terrorism raids | Aid groups snub Italian code of conduct on Mediterranean rescues | Saudi Arabia reportedly using Canadian military trucks against its own civilians | US hits Nicolás Maduro with sanctions after Venezuela’s ‘sham’ election

Trump removes Anthony Scaramucci as White House communications director

  • White House communications director Anthony Scaramucci has been removed from his job after just 10 days in a move that has only increased the sense of chaos at the heart of the Trump administration.
  • The shock development follows a turbulent series of media appearances over the last week by the combative former Wall Street financier, capped by a foul-mouthed tirade to a New Yorker journalist on Thursday.
  • News of his rapid political demise came less than six hours after the appointment of former US marine Gen John Kelly as Donald Trump’s new chief of staff.
  • “Anthony Scaramucci will be leaving his role as White House communications director,” said press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders in a statement on Monday afternoon. “Mr Scaramucci felt it was best to give chief of staff John Kelly a clean slate and the ability to build his own team. We wish him all the best.”

Guardian Analysis | Scaramucci exit after 10 turbulent days shows chaos reigns at the White House

  • “The Mooch” got his marching orders from the newly appointed chief of staff, John Kelly, a four-star marine general whose experience in Iraq suddenly seems invaluable for this White House: now a melee of competing actors, rival factions and complex alliances fighting for territory.
  • As it happened, minutes after the Mooch’s fate was sealed, Trump and Kelly were in the east room of the White House to award a medal of honor to a veteran army medic who served in Vietnam. What should have been a solemn ceremony suddenly felt cheapened.
  • Scaramucci burned twice as bright and half as long; he had not even been formally sworn in to his new position. He reportedly had the backing of fellow New Yorkers Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner. He was described by Charlie Sykes, a conservative commentator, as “Trump’s id”.
  • Evidently Kelly determined that Trump’s id has no place in the White House. Scaramucci’s vulgar, expletive-riddled interview with the New Yorker magazine last week was a sackable offence, especially in the eyes of a military man looking to instil some old-fashioned discipline. Among other things, the Mooch proved himself a communications director who did not grasp the rules of “off the record”.
  • When Trump’s White House came into being, there was a readily identifiable three-way struggle for power between the family, the party establishment and the “alt-right” disruptors.

Twelve key departures in six months of Donald Trump’s presidency

The 12 key departures from Trump’s administration during his 193 days in office so far:

  1. 10 days – Anthony Scaramucci
  2. 11 days – Sally Yates
  3. 23 days – Michael Flynn
  4. 70 days – Katie Walsh
  5. 86 days – Mike Dubke
  6. 106 days – Angella Reid
  7. 110 days – James Comey
  8. 118 days – KT McFarland
  9. 181 days – Walter Shaub
  10. 183 days – Sean Spicer
  11. 187 days – Michael Short
  12. 189 days – Reince Priebus

Trump personally crafted son’s misleading account of Russia meeting – report

  • President Trump personally dictated the press statement issued in the name of his eldest son that misleadingly downplayed the significance of a 2016 meeting with a Kremlin-linked Russian lawyer, a new report alleged on Monday night.
  • According to the Washington Post, Trump personally intervened to prevent senior White House advisers from issuing a full and truthful account of the meeting on 9 June 2016 in which Donald Trump Jr, the president’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, and then presidential campaign manager Paul Manafort came face-to-face with four Russians. One of the Russian visitors was the well-connected lawyer Natalia Veselnitskaya.
  • The report, based on multiple though largely anonymous sources that included the president’s own advisers, has the potential to cause political, and even legal, trouble for the White House because it draws Trump himself much closer into the fray over the Trump Tower meeting, which has become a lightning rod in the Russian affair.
  • Shunning the guidance of lawyers, and overturning the view apparently reached by Kushner and his team of advisers that a full and frank accounting should be made, Trump reportedly dictated a statement on board Air Force One as he was flying back to Washington from the G20 summit in Germany. As would soon become apparent, it gave a very partial and distorted account of events.

Nicky Morgan requests assessment of City’s readiness for hard Brexit

  • The Conservative MP Nicky Morgan has asked the Bank of England to provide comprehensive details of the City’s readiness for a hard Brexit, in an early indication of the agenda she hopes to pursue as head of one of parliament’s most influential committees.
  • The newly elected chair of the Treasury select committee also called on the Bank to provide its views on what a Brexit transition deal should look like to minimise damage to the City. An analysis by the consultancy firm Oliver Wyman calculated that up to 40,000 jobs in the wholesale banking sector – which provides services to companies – could be at risk.
  • Morgan issued her request to Sam Woods, a deputy governor at the Bank, which had given hundreds of banks, insurers, fund managers and other major City firms a deadline of July 14 to demonstrate how they would cope with a hard Brexit.
  • Morgan told Woods that the committee – which is still being constituted and will not meet until the autumn – may want to consider the implications for financial services of the UK leaving the EU and that she wants him to provide the information, without providing specifics about each firm, by Wednesday.

Unsecured consumer credit tops £200bn for first time since 2008

  • The financial watchdog has announced fresh measures to protect consumers from spiralling debt as official data showed that borrowing through credit cards, overdrafts and car loans has topped £200bn for the first time since the global financial crisis. The Financial Conduct Authority said it was cracking down on the high cost of overdrafts and reviewing the booming car loan market.
  • The regulator’s latest intervention came as credit ratings agency Moody’s also warned about the growing household debt mountain, saying that some borrowers would struggle to repay their debt as the economy weakened and inflation ate into their salaries.
  • Unsecured consumer credit, which includes credit cards, car loans and overdrafts, peaked in the autumn of 2008 – just as the banking crisis was taking hold. It fell in subsequent years, but has been rising again since 2014 and is now in touching distance of the pre-crisis lending boom.
  • Data from the Bank of England on Monday showed that it grew by 10% in the year to June, to almost £201bn. The last time outstanding debt was above £200bn was December 2008.
  • In a paper published on Monday, the FCA said that one in six people with debt on credit cards, personal lending and car loans – 2.2 million – were in financial distress. They are more likely to be younger, have children, be unemployed and less educated than others.
  • As households grapple with rising living costs, charities and policymakers have raised concerns that consumers are increasingly turning to loans amid worrying signs of a return to reckless lending by the banks.

Grenfell fire inquiry may have to suspend work if CPS brings charges

  • The judge-led inquiry into the Grenfell Tower fire is in danger of having to suspend operations entirely for a lengthy period if prosecutors authorise corporate manslaughter charges.
  • Last week police publicly identified Kensington and Chelsea council and the organisation that managed the tower block as suspects, creating the potential for conflict with Sir Martin Moore-Bick’s public inquiry.
  • The pace of the police investigation raises questions about which should take priority. Legal opinion is divided although the majority believe that the criminal investigation must go ahead first, a decision that would have repercussions for the official Grenfell Tower Fire Inquiry. However, survivors and residents have expressed alarm at the prospect of the inquiry being delayed or diluted.
  • The inquiry is aware of the problem and is considering various options, including whether it might have to radically refocus its approach or even delay its hearings for a time. It is due to send recommendations about its terms of reference to the prime minister as early as next week

Suicides of nearly 60,000 Indian farmers linked to climate change, study claims

  • Climate change may have contributed to the suicides of nearly 60,000 Indian farmers and farm workers over the past three decades, according to new research that examines the toll rising temperatures are already taking on vulnerable societies.
  • Illustrating the extreme sensitivity of the Indian agricultural industry to spikes in temperature, the study from the University of California, Berkeley, found an increase of just 1C on an average day during the growing season was associated with 67 more suicides.
  • An increase of 5C on any one day was associated with an additional 335 deaths, the study published in the journal PNAS on Monday found. In total, it estimates that 59,300 agricultural sector suicides over the past 30 years could be attributed to warming.
  • Temperature increases outside the growing season showed no significant impact on suicide rates, suggesting stress on the agriculture industry was the source of the increase in suicides.
  • Also supporting the theory was that rainfall increases of as little as 1cm each year were associated with an average 7% drop in the suicide rate. So beneficial was the strong rainfall that suicide rates were lower for the two years that followed, researcher Tamma Carleton found

UK urges tech giants to do more to prevent spread of extremism

  • Amber Rudd will urge social media companies to do more to remove online terrorist content during a series of meetings with tech giants including Twitter and Facebook, after a sharp increase in the number of plots foiled in the UK. The home secretary will warn that extremists have exploited web platforms as way of spreading their “hateful messages” when she attends the Global Internet Forum to Counter Terrorism in Silicon Valley.
  • Theresa May had previously warned that the fight against Islamic State was shifting from the “battlefield to the internet” when she attended the G7 meeting in Sicily in the wake of the Manchester terror attack. World leaders called on internet service providers to “substantially increase” their efforts to crackdown on extremist content.
  • “The responsibility for tackling this threat at every level lies with both governments and with industry. We have a shared interest: we want to protect our citizens and keep the free and open internet we all love,” Rudd is expected to tell the internet providers.
  • She will claim that the forum, which was created by Facebook, Microsoft, Twitter and YouTube, marks an opportunity to start “turning the tide” on the issue. It comes after a 21-year-old from Slough, Taha Hussain, was found guilty of encouraging people to instigate, prepare or commit acts of terror including through online content.

Guardian’s Brexit weekly briefing: while May’s away, the cabinet fray

  • The more they insist they are all singing from the same Brexit hymn-sheet, the less it seems to look like it. Especially when the prime minister is on holiday.
  • Jeremy Hunt is the latest minister to claim the cabinet is “absolutely united” behind a gradual, business-friendly Brexit that avoids – among other things – a sudden end to EU immigration.
  • Along with Amber Rudd, Damian Green and other “gradualists”, the health secretary agrees with Philip Hammond that for some time after it formally leaves the bloc in March 2019, the UK’s relationship with the EU needs to be “similar in many ways” to what it is now.
  • With Theresa May away, the chancellor spoke last week of a “broad consensus” on the need for a two- to three-year period – possibly until the 2022 election – during which the UK would accept free movement, be part of the single market and refrain from striking trade deals with other countries.
  • But that hardly chimes with the cabinet’s Brexit hardliners, headed by the Brexit secretary, David Davis, and international trade secretary Liam Fox. Fox says he was not party to any discussion – and certainly didn’t agree a position – on the nature of a transitional deal:

“We made it clear that control of our own borders was one of the elements we wanted in the referendum and unregulated free movement would seem to me not to keep faith with that decision”

  • The former Brexit minister David Jones said the cabinet gradualists were taking advantage of May’s absence to “go on manoeuvres”, while former Tory leader Iain Duncan Smith urged all concerned to shut up or risk making negotiations with the EU even more difficult.
  • Hammond is also believed to have told business leaders he wanted a simple, off-the-shelf model for the transitional period – something Downing Street promptly ruled out, saying the precise “implementation model” was “up for negotiation”.
  • In all, such clear and unresolved tensions within the cabinet suggest the government still does not have a firm idea of what form it wants the UK’s departure from the EU to take. And there are now barely 18 months left on the clock

Jacinda Ardern becomes youngest New Zealand Labour leader after Andrew Little quits

  • Andrew Little, the leader of New Zealand’s opposition Labour party, has stepped down less than two months before the country’s general election, with his deputy Jacinda Ardern taking his place.
  • The resignation comes after six weeks of declining popularity and three devastating weekend polls that placed support for Labour at just 23 to 24% – the party’s worst results since 1995.
  • Ardern, 37, was elected as the new leader of the beleaguered Labour party in a unanimous vote on Tuesday morning shortly after Little’s resignation, with Maori MP Kelvin Davis to be her deputy.
  • Ardern joined the Labour party at 17 and was elected to parliament in 2008. She is well-liked by the general public for her warmth and informality. The sometime DJ and former Mormon polls well with the young and women particularly.
  • But despite her “cool” factor she has been criticised for being inexperienced and untested.

Sydney counter-terrorism raids: alleged plane plot was ‘well along’, US officials say

  • A terrorist plot to bring down a plane was “fairly well along” when Australian authorities moved in, US officials say, amid claims the four men arrested over the plan had links to Islamic State.
  • The men, named in media reports as father and son Khaled and Mahmoud Khayat, and Khaled and Abdul Merhi, remain behind bars and are yet to be charged after being arrested on Saturday.
  • Khaled Khayat’s brother is believed to be a senior Isis figure, while the other two men are related to Ahmed Merhi, who travelled to Syria in 2014, the ABC reported.
  • Australian federal police have not elaborated on the details of the plan to “bring down” a plane and will not confirm if a series of raids in Surry Hills, Lakemba, Wiley Park and Punchbowl were triggered by overseas intelligence alerts.
  • Reuters has cited two US officials familiar with the arrests as saying the Australian investigation was not a sting operation but the result of the detection of a developing plot.
  • One said it was “fairly well along” when Australian authorities disrupted it. The target, the other official said, appeared to have been a commercial flight from Sydney to the Gulf

Aid groups snub Italian code of conduct on Mediterranean rescues

  • Five aid groups that operate migrant rescue ships in the Mediterranean have refused to sign up to the Italian government’s code of conduct, the Interior Ministry said, but three others backed the new rules.
  • Charity boats have become increasingly important in rescue operations, picking up more than a third of all migrants brought ashore so far this year against less than one percent in 2014, according to the Italian coastguard.
  • Italy, fearing that the groups were facilitating people smuggling from North Africa and encouraging migrants to make the perilous passage to Europe, proposed a code containing around a dozen points for the charities. Those who refused to sign the document had put themselves “outside the organised system of sea rescues, with all the concrete consequences that can have”, the ministry said.
  • Italy had previously threatened to shut its ports to NGOs that did not sign up, but an source within the Interior Ministry said that in reality those groups would face more checks from Italian authorities

Saudi Arabia reportedly using Canadian military trucks against its own civilians

  • The Canadian government is investigating reports that Saudi Arabia is using armoured vehicles made in Canada against its own civilians – allegations that have prompted renewed scrutiny over Ottawa’s recent decision to sign off on a billion-dollar arms deal with the kingdom.
  • Videos and photos posted on social media in recent days allegedly show Riyadh using Canadian equipment in a violent crackdown on minority Shia dissidents in eastern Saudi Arabia. Last week at least five people were killed as security forces flushed out suspected militants in the town of Awamiya.
  • Several sources told the Canadian newspaper the Globe and Mail that the vehicles being used appeared to be Gurkha RPVs made in Ontario by Terradyne Armoured Vehicles.
  • Canadian officials said they were deeply concerned by the reports. “We are looking at these claims very seriously … and have immediately launched a review,” Justin Trudeau told reporters.
  • In 2016, Saudi Arabia ranked among the largest importers of Canada-made military goods, purchasing more than C$142m worth of goods – nearly 20% of all Canadian military exports that year.

US hits Nicolás Maduro with sanctions after Venezuela’s ‘sham’ election

The US government has imposed financial sanctions on Venezuela’s president, Nicolás Maduro, after the election of a new legislative body to redraft the country’s constitution in a vote described by Washington as a “sham.”

Maduro hailed Sunday’s election as a popular mandate to dramatically recast the troubled state, but his political opponents have warned this could lead to the dissolution of existing powers and turn the country into a fully fledged dictatorship.

On Monday, he was added to the growing list of high-ranking Venezuelan officials target for sanctions which freeze any of Maduro’s assets under US jurisdiction, and prohibit US citizens from doing business with him.

“Yesterday’s illegitimate elections confirm that Maduro is a dictator who disregards the will of the Venezuelan people,” said treasury secretary Steven Mnuchin. “By sanctioning Maduro, the United States makes clear our opposition to the policies of his regime and our support for the people of Venezuela who seek to return their country to a full and prosperous democracy.”

Acording to Reuters, the US is still considering broader sanctions against Venezuela’s oil industry, which could prove devastating for a country which is already in a state of economic free fall.

 

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BLUE PILL NEWS | Kate shines…where tens of thousands died

BLUE PILL NEWS | Kate shines

BLUE PILL NEWS | Kate shines

Kate Shines in the same white dress she wore to Charlotte’s baptism, reports the Daily Mail, as she and Will join Belgium’s Queen Mathilde at the Menin Gate to mark the centenary of the Battle of Passchendaele

  • The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge joined Belgian royals to mark 100 years since Battle of Passchendaele
  • Prince Charles and Theresa May also marking centenary of battle between Allied Troops and German forces
  • Prince William gave a speech at the Menin Gate monument in Ypres, Belgium, as the daily Last Post played

MEANWHILE….a Memorial for those that Died (Siegfried Sasson)

Squire nagged and bullied till I went to fight,
(Under Lord Derby’s Scheme). I died in hell –
(They called it Passchendaele). My wound was slight,
And I was hobbling back; and then a shell
Burst slick upon the duck-boards: so I fell
Into the bottomless mud, and lost the light.

At sermon-time, while Squire is in his pew,
He gives my gilded name a thoughtful stare;
For, though low down upon the list, I’m there;
‘In proud and glorious memory’…that’s my due.
Two bleeding years I fought in France, for Squire:
I suffered anguish that he’s never guessed.
Once I came home on leave: and then went west…
What greater glory could a man desire?

BLUE PILL NEWS | Kate Shines

BLUE PILL NEWS | Kate Shines

Having prophesied a decisive success (Haig), it had taken over three months, 325,000 Allied and 260,000 German casualties to do little more than make the bump of the Ypres salient somewhat larger

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Truth Rating

BROADCASTING HOUSE | NEWS FROM THE RIGHT | 2017-07-31

BROADCASTING HOUSE | NEWS FROM THE RIGHT | 2017-08-01

BROADCASTING HOUSE | NEWS FROM THE RIGHT | 2017-07-31

Car Rental Repair Con | Exploitative Landlords | Antisemitism at the Sunday Times | Kate Shines at Passchendaele Memorial |  Cambridge University Student on Dalston Riots | Vince Cable on Boris’ Plans to Quit over EU row | Jihadists stripped of passports | Tennessee Tasering | Konstanz Nightclub Shooting | Channel 4’s Diana Tapes | Carney Orders Hight Street Banks to reveal Lending Tactics | JK Rowling Fake News | Trump Furious with China

Car rental firms don’t do repairs you pay for: Companies admit to not fixing scratches and dents that tourists are charged hundreds of pounds for

  • Major companies admit to not always fixing dents and scratches they charge for
  • Avis Budget, Hertz and Enterprise are among those to have been caught out
  • Holidaymakers now face a bill of more than £2,000 for damaging their hire car

The tycoon who owns freeholds of 40,000 homes: Mogul has made millions through ‘exploitative’ ground rent fees

  • James Tuttiett has built a massive property empire of controversial freeholds
  • This allows him to charge homeowners for the land their house is built on
  • Leaseholders must pay ground rents to his company E&J Estates
  • Some rents double every decade and will reach thousands of pounds a year

Sunday Times columnist Kevin Myers ‘will not write again’ for the paper after his ‘offensive column’ on Jewish BBC presenters Claudia Winkleman and Vanessa Feltz

  • Myers noted that two of the best-paid female presenters were Jewish
  • His comments in the Sunday Times Ireland prompted a backlash on social media
  • Editor Martin Ivens apologised personally for the ‘unacceptable comments’

Kate shines in same white dress she wore to Charlotte’s baptism as she and Wills join Belgium’s Queen Mathilde at the Menin Gate to mark the centenary of the Battle of Passchendaele

  • The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge joined Belgian royals to mark 100 years since Battle of Passchendaele
  • Prince Charles and Theresa May also marking centenary of battle between Allied Troops and German forces
  • Prince William gave a speech at the Menin Gate monument in Ypres, Belgium, as the daily Last Post played

Police investigate Cambridge University student who claimed ‘all white people are racist’ in massive Twitter rant

  • Jason Osamede Okundaye posted tweets amid violent protests
  • He said white people ‘colonised’ Dalston and said it was ‘delicious’ to watch riots
  • The Cambridge student wrote: ‘ALL white people are racist. White middle class, white working class, white men, white women, white gays, white children’

Boris on the brink of quitting over EU row, says Cable: Foreign Secretary accuses Lib Dem leader of ‘peddling lies’ as he says he is ‘working closely’ with Hammond

  • Sir Vince Cable claimed tensions over Brexit are so severe Boris could resign
  • The Foreign Secretary’s aides initially declined to comment but then u-turned
  • A spokesman eventually accused the new Lib Dem leader of ‘making his stuff up’
  • Mr Johnson and other ministers were not informed of Philip Hammond’s Brexit plans

More than 150 jihadists are stripped of UK passports as fears heighten over new wave of attacks if they return

  • Intelligence chiefs warn 300 extremists could return from Syria to the UK
  • Security sources revealed in May that 350 Isis fighters had already come back
  • Former head of counter-terrorism: ‘Citizenship of the UK is not an absolute right’
  • MI5 claims around 3,000 violent Islamic extremists are operating in the UK

Two dead and three fight for their lives as an attacker with a MACHINE GUN opens fire in a German nightclub before he is slain by police

  • Gunman burst into Grey nightclub in German city of Konstanz and opened fire
  • The 34-year-old attacker is thought to have been armed with a machine gun
  • Special forces sent to the scene with the gunman ‘put out of action’ in minutes
  • Witnesses described victims covered in blood as they were taken to hospital
  • Three people remain seriously hurt after the horror shooting at a student night

REVEALED: TWO Lebanese-Australian father and son teams planned ‘chilling ISIS-inspired plot to kill passengers on plane with deadly GAS released from a bomb disguised as a meat-mincer’

  • Lebanese-Australian father and son duos were reportedly the men arrested
  • Fresh details have emerged about an alleged terrorist plot to blow up a plane
  • Islamist cell allegedly planned to bring down international flight with explosive
  • Police raided homes in Sydney’s Surry Hills, Lakemba, Punchbowl and Wiley Park
  • Malcolm Turnbull said extra security measures taken at airports across Australia

Blood money! Growing fury at Channel 4’s plan to screen ‘deeply personal’ Diana tapes described as ‘incredibly hurtful’ for her family

  • Queen’s former press secretary said Diana was unaware tapes would come out
  • Dickie Arbiter said their release is ‘shameful’ and down to ‘grubby blood money’
  • Royal biographer Penny Junor said footage ‘extremely humiliating’ for Charles
  • Tapes made by Diana’s voice coach and Coronation Street actor Peter Settelen

Charles and Diana ‘didn’t have sex for seven years’: How Prince transformed from being ‘all over his wife like a bad rash’ before their love life ‘fizzled out entirely’ after Harry was born

  • Princess’ revelations came from interviews with her voice coach Peter Settelen
  • Diana said when royal couple first courted, the thrill was ‘immense and intense’
  • She revealed the couple’s sex life fizzled out just years after they were married

‘I’ll keep on doing that until I run out of batteries’: Three Tennessee deputies are suspended after horrifying footage emerges of them repeatedly using a Taser on a boy, 18, while he was tied to a chair

  • Jordan Elias Norris, now 19, has filed an excessive force lawsuit after his arrest for drugs and weapons offences last November
  • The teen says he was repeatedly tasered while he was restrained by deputies at Cheatham County Jail
  • Shocking footage appears to show one of the officers repeatedly using a taser on Norris while he was bound to a chair
  • ‘I’ll keep on doing that until I run out of batteries,’ the officer is heard telling Norris in the jail surveillance footage
  • Norris claims he suffered more than 40 pairs of taser burns while in custody
  • Three Cheatham County are now on administrative leave and the sheriff has contacted the District Attorney to request an independent investigation

Bank of England chief orders banks to reveal ‘reckless’ lending tactics as part of moves to tackle national borrowing binge

  • Fears growing as families increasingly using overdrafts, credit cards and loans
  • Some have called for a crackdown on irresponsible lending by car dealers
  • Bank of England Financial stability director Alex Brazier last week warned of a ‘spiral of complacency’

J.K. Rowling falsely accuses Donald Trump of avoiding shaking the hand of a wheelchair-bound three-year-old boy as Piers Morgan labels the author as a ‘disgraceful liar’

  • The president held a press conference July 24 where he had met with the ‘victims of Obamacare before hand’
  • Trump shook the hand of a little boy, aged 3, in a wheelchair before taking stage
  • Edited video clip that was shared to Twitter shows him skipping the child, when that was not true
  • But author J.K. Rowling went on Twitter rant blasting Trump for avoiding the boy
  • Piers Morgan and others are now calling her out over the tweets and requesting she delete them and apologize

Top general says the US is ready to use ‘rapid, lethal and overwhelming force’ on North Korea after Kim’s second intercontinental ballistic missile test

  • Terrence J. O’Shaughnessy calls North Korea ‘urgent threat’ after ICBM test
  • Pacific Air Forces commander underlines US resolve to defend self and allies
  • Remarks come as US flies two B-1 heavy bombers over Korean Peninsula
  • Tensions mount after North Korea’s second successful ICBM tests this month

Trump turns on China: Furious president says country could ‘easily’ solve problem with North Korea but does nothing to help America except ‘talk’ as he dispatches two B-1 bombers to Korean Peninsula

  • President Trump slammed China in a series of tweets on Saturday night
  • He blames past American leaders for ‘allowing’ China to profit off trade and not helping with North Korea in return
  • Trump said China could ‘easily’ solve the problem if the country wanted to
  • North Korea launched a successful missile that landed near Japan on Friday
  • Experts claim the country can reach mainland US cities with the weapons
  • Hours later, the U.S. flew two B-1B bombers over the Korean peninsula, joined by Japanese and South Korean fighter jets, in a show of force

Treasure hunter who found £500million of Nazi treasure in a Bavarian wood says landowner won’t let him dig it up ‘because he wants it for himself’

  • Treasure hunter says hoard of gold buried in German forest is worth a fortune
  • But the landlord won’t let him extract it because ‘he wants it all for himself’
  • Fortune seeker Hans Glueck obtained coordinates for the loot from a map
  • It was once in the possession of an SS officer who was arrested and executed

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NEWS FROM THE LEFT | Broadcasting House | 2017-07-31

NEWS FROM THE LEFT | Broadcasting House | 2017-07-31

NEWS FROM THE LEFT | Broadcasting House | 2017-07-31

Cabinet Tensions over Post-Brexit free movement | Oxera Trade Report on Border Controls | Liam Fox | Phil Hammond | Sunday Times Antisemitism | Pressure on BBC to Act over Gender Pay Gap | Venezuela heading for dictatorship after ‘sham’ election | No end to Greek Debt Crisis | Further erosion of US Russian diplomacy | Rince Prebus replaces General Joh Kelly | Imran Khan calls for ‘real democracy’ in Pakistan | US flies B-1B bombers over Korean peninsula after missile test | Trump Tweets against China over Korean Missile Test

Tensions flare in cabinet over post-Brexit free movement

  • Senior Conservative MPs are urging members of Theresa May’s cabinet to stop publicly setting out their demands for a transitional deal on Brexit, saying the move could make negotiations with the European Union more difficult.
  • The warnings from senior leave campaigners and allies of the Brexit secretary, David Davis, come as ministers prepare to clash over issues of immigration and trade in a series of key meetings this autumn.
  • Philip Hammond, Amber Rudd, Damian Green, David Gauke and Greg Clark are among those likely to push the prime minister to accept that while free movement will officially end, there should be no immediate move to reduce immigration.
  • But the divisions in the cabinet were laid bare as Liam Fox said in an interview that there was no cabinet-wide agreement on what a post-Brexit implementation period should look like, and warned that “control of our own borders” was a key driver of the leave vote

Hammond and Fox are not on the same Brexit page

  • Senior government sources have argued that the chancellor, Philip Hammond, and international trade secretary, Liam Fox, are on the same page when it comes to Brexit.
  • “The chancellor is absolutely right to say freedom of movement will end in March 2019 and a new immigration system will be implemented,” went the logic.
  • “Similarly, Liam is absolutely right to say that freedom of movement continuing after March 2019, would not be right.”
  • The word semantics springs to mind. While the two statements above are technically both correct, Hammond and Fox (and other remain and leave voices across the cabinet) have very different outlooks

Liam Fox denies cabinet deal on transitional EU free movement

  • Liam Fox has said there is no cabinet-wide agreement for the suggestion by the chancellor, Philip Hammond, that free movement could continue for up to three years after Brexit.
  • Exposing a divide across Theresa May’s top table, the international trade secretary warned that “control of our own borders” was one of the key elements behind the leave vote and said free movement must end in 2019.
  • His remarks emerged after Hammond said “many things will look similar” on the day after Brexit in March 2019, with a three-year transitional period.
  • The chancellor claimed there was “broad consensus” in the cabinet about the idea of transition but that it should not extend beyond the next general election.
  • That followed reports of the cabinet agreeing to the idea that free movement could continue alongside access to the single market during transition, and Britain would be constrained in signing new trade deals

The Observer – Trade Report: Brexit border chaos will cause huge delays & cost £1bn a year

  • Britain will be hit by huge border delays, require vast lorry parks in the south-east, and suffer more than £1bn a year in economic damage, according to a stark economic analysis of the likely impact of customs checks after Brexit.
  • Additional costs associated with potential motorway queues, extra customs staff and jobs lost as a result of companies relocating mean even that assessment is “extremely conservative”, a study by a leading economic consultancy warns.
  • The alarming assessment, by the Europe-wide Oxera consultancy, sets out what it describes as the most likely impact of the new border checks imposed after Brexit. The warning comes after Michel Barnier, the European Union’s chief Brexit negotiator, ruled that the government’s hopes of securing “frictionless” trade outside the EU was not possible. It also follows a week in which cabinet Brexiters signalled they were ready to adopt a comprehensive transitional deal for up to three years, as ministers attempt to buy time to tackle a series of unresolved policy challenges raised by Brexit

Oxera Report – Brexit: the implications for UK ports (Conclusion)

  • Extensive regulation of products, combined with increased levels of enforcement, will lead to a significant increase in the requirements at borders.
  • The Port of Dover has called this scenario ‘Armageddon’[8], potentially leading to an almost-permanent instigation of Operation Stack—with extensive queues on the M20 and surrounding roads in Kent.
  • Achieving even a low-friction outcome will not be easy, and business in both the UK and the EU needs to know very soon the customs rules under which they will be trading. The decision cannot be part of a last-minute deal on the eve of Brexit, due to the time it will take to get trade moving under the new arrangements. The costs to logistics businesses and their customers, users of the road network and, eventually, jobs in the UK of a relatively limited increase in friction will be considerable.
  • And ‘no deal’ on a customs union would have extremely serious consequences for the UK economy. Providing a policy direction in this area should be a priority for the government when Parliament returns from recess.

Sunday Times accused of antisemitism over column on BBC pay

  • The Sunday Times has been accused of antisemitism after it published an article in its Irish edition that suggested the BBC presenters Claudia Winkleman and Vanessa Feltz were well paid because they are Jewish.
  • The Rupert Murdoch-owned newspaper removed an online version of the piece by Holocaust denier Kevin Myers on Sunday morning amid a wave of outrage, but it appeared in printed editions of the newspaper across Ireland.
  • Under the headline “Sorry ladies, equal pay has to be earned”, Myers wrote: “I note that two of the best-paid women presenters in the BBC – Claudia Winkleman and Vanessa Feltz, with whose, no doubt, sterling work I am tragically unacquainted – are Jewish. Good for them.
  • “Jews are not generally noted for their insistence on selling their talent for the lowest possible price, which is the most useful measure there is of inveterate, lost-with-all-hands stupidity. I wonder, who are their agents? If they’re the same ones that negotiated the pay for the women on the lower scales, then maybe the latter have found their true value in the marketplace.”
  • Lionel Barber, the editor of the Financial Times, described the piece as “undiluted antisemitism and misogyny” while the former Europe minister Denis MacShane said the comments were “truly shameful”.
  • Danny Cohen, the former director of BBC television, called on the Sunday Times to prevent Myers from writing for any News UK paper ever again.
  • After the column was removed, the editor of the Sunday Times, Martin Ivens, issued a statement saying Myers’ comments were “unacceptable and should not have been published”.

Female BBC stars urge corporation to ‘act now’ on pay and gender

  • Some of the BBC’s most high-profile female personalities have written a frank open letter to the director general, Tony Hall, calling on him to “act now” and tackle the gender pay gap.
  • Household names including presenters Clare Balding, Victoria Derbyshire and Angela Rippon are among at least 40 women who have used their “strong and loud voices” to urge him to “correct this disparity” over gender pay, which they say has been known within the corporation “for years”.
  • It comes after documents setting out the pay for staff on more than £150,000 showed a sizeable gap in the earnings of the corporation’s most well-known male and female presenters and actors, with Radio 2 presenter Chris Evans topping the list on more than £2m, while the highest paid woman was Strictly’s Claudia Winkleman on £450,000-£499,999.

Venezuela heading for dictatorship after ‘sham’ election, warns US amid clashes

  • The United States has vowed to take strong and swift action against the “architects of authoritarianism” in Venezuela after protesters and security forces fought deadly street battles during voting for President Nicolás Maduro’s controversial constitutional assembly.
  • “The United States stands by the people of Venezuela, and their constitutional representatives, in their quest to restore their country to a full and prosperous democracy,” the US State Department said in a statement. “We will continue to take strong and swift actions against the architects of authoritarianism in Venezuela, including those who participate in the national constituent assembly as a result of today’s flawed election,” it said.
  • Many voters decided against taking part in an election the opposition said would turn the country into a full-fledged dictatorship.
  • As many as 14 people died in the protests, according to opposition leader Henrique Capriles, and the prosecutor’s office confirmed at least six people were killed by gunfire, including one national guardsman. Seven policemen were wounded in an explosion in the opposition stronghold neighbourhood of Altamira.

Greek debt crisis: ‘People can’t see any light at the end of any tunnel’

  • Athens, like most urban centres, has been hardest hit by a crisis that has seen the country’s economic output contract by a devastating 26%. A study by the DiaNeosis thinktank found that 15% of the population, or 1,647,703 people, in 2015 earned below the extreme poverty threshold. In 2009 that number did not exceed 2.2%. The net wealth of Greek households fell by a precipitous 40% in the same period, according to the Bank of Greece. Unemployment, austerity’s most pernicious effect, hovers around 22%, by far the highest in the EU, despite a 5% drop in the last two years.
  • Although the worst is over in terms of fiscal adjustment, few believe Greece will be able to escape a fourth bailout even if Athens regains market access when its current EU-IMF sponsored programme ends in August next year.
  • “It is very difficult to see the country being able to make a clean exit [from international stewardship] and raise the sort of money it needs to refinance its debt,” said Kyriakos Pierrakakis, director of research at DiaNeosis. “It will almost certainly need a new financial credit line, a bailout light, and that will come with new conditions.”

Putin: US must cut diplomatic staff in Russia by 755

  • President Vladimir Putin said the United States would have to cut its diplomatic staff in Russia by 755 people and that Russia could consider imposing additional measures against the US as a response to new sanctions approved by Congress.
  • Moscow ordered the US on Friday to cut hundreds of diplomatic staff and said it would seize two US diplomatic properties after the House of Representatives and the Senate approved new sanctions on Russia. The White House said on Friday that President Donald Trump would sign the sanctions bill.
  • A US State Department official said on Sunday Russia’s decision was “regrettable” and that it was now weighing its options. “This is a regrettable and uncalled for act,” the official said. “We are assessing the impact of such a limitation and how we will respond to it.”
  • Putin said in an interview with Vesti TV released on Sunday that the US would have to cut its diplomatic and technical staff by 755 people by 1 September. “Because more than 1,000 workers – diplomats and support staff – were working and are still working in Russia, 755 must stop their activity in the Russian Federation,” he said

Trump’s new chief of staff will establish clear ‘pecking order’, staffers say

  • Donald Trump’s new chief of staff, Gen John Kelly, will instil discipline and a clear chain of command in the White House, senior staffers have claimed.
  • After a disastrous week of legislative failure and poisonous infighting culminated in the removal of chief of staff Reince Priebus and his replacement with the retired US Marine Corps general who has been leading the Department of Homeland Security, Trump’s adviser Kellyanne Conway said she was getting ready to obey orders.
  • “I will do whatever the president and our new chief ask me to do,” Conway told Fox News Sunday. “I’m always a protocol and pecking order kind of gal.”

Imran Khan calls for ‘real democracy’ in Pakistan following Sharif dismissal

  • Pakistan’s opposition leader, Imran Khan, has called for a future of “real democracy” in the country, following the dismissal of Nawaz Sharif as prime minister over corruption charges.
  • “We are thankful to the judiciary because with their judgment, they brought us a new hope,” Khan told a gathering of thousands of supporters on Sunday.
  • The rally in Islamabad was a triumphant celebration for the heartthrob-cricketer-turned-populist-politician, who, since last year, has led a campaign to oust Sharif.
  • Friday’s ruling by Pakistan’s highest court disrupted what had otherwise looked like a smooth path to next year’s election for Sharif’s PML-N party.
  • Former oil minister Shahid Khaqan Abbasi will most likely be approved as interim prime minister on Tuesday, at a special session in the 342-member parliament, where the ruling PML-N party holds a strong majority.
  • Abbasi will hold the position for less than two months, until Shahbaz Sharif, younger brother of the ousted prime minister, is confirmed in parliament and can take over.
  • Thousands of supporters from Khan’s Pakistan Tehreek-e Insaf (PTI) party congregated at Islamabad’s parade ground on Sunday for what had been termed a “thanksgiving day”, the latest of Khan’s signature rallies that have helped him drum up popular support.

US flies B-1B bombers over Korean peninsula after missile test

  • The US flew two supersonic B-1B bombers over the Korean peninsula in a show of force on Sunday, as the US ambassador to the UN warned that China, Japan and South Korea needed to do more after Pyongyang’s latest missile tests.
  • North Korea said it had conducted another successful test of an intercontinental ballistic missile on Friday that proved its ability to strike America’s mainland.
  • Nikki Haley, the US ambassador to the UN, said on Twitter on Saturday that the US was “done talking” about North Korea, which was “not only a US problem”.
  • “China is aware they must act,” Haley said, urging Japan and South Korea to increase pressure and calling for an international solution

Donald Trump says China does ‘nothing’ to thwart North Korea’s nuclear quest

  • Donald Trump has launched his latest Twitter assault on China, accusing its Communist party leaders of doing “NOTHING” to help the United States thwart North Korea’s quest for nuclear weapons.
  • “I am very disappointed in China,” Trump wrote. “Our foolish past leaders have allowed them to make hundreds of billions of dollars a year in trade, yet … they do NOTHING for us with North Korea, just talk.
  • “We will no longer allow this to continue. China could easily solve this problem!” he added.
  • The comments came after Kim Jong-un celebrated his country’s second intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) test late on Friday, in what North Korean state media described as a warning to the “beast-like US imperialists”.

 

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BROADCASTING HOUSE | NEWS FROM THE RIGHT | 2017-07-27

BROADCASTING HOUSE | NEWS FROM THE RIGHT | 2017-07-27

BROADCASTING HOUSE | NEWS FROM THE RIGHT | 2017-07-27

Bosses Warn of Employment Tribunal Flood | Full Antiobotic Courses Encourage Superbugs | North Korean Sabre Rattling | Charlie Gard Tragedy being turned into ‘Sick Spectacle’ | Instagram Crashes | Lloyds Bank to Repay £300m to 600K Customers | Chlorinated Chicken | Speed Bumps Increase Pollution | North Korean Elite’s Internet Browsing Habits | Increase in Anti-semitic Hate Crimes | Adam Peaty

Furious bosses warn of a tide of employment tribunals after the Supreme Court rules ministers acted unlawfully in bringing in £1,200 charge to make a claim

  • Seven judges ruled unanimously in favour of union Unison, which said charges discriminated against women and poorly paid
  • Court: Fees were ‘inconsistent with access to justice’ and led to big fall in claims
  • Smaller firms fear they will now have to settle cases they’d win because they cannot afford the time and expense of fighting them
  • Government will have to refund £32m to thousands of people charged for taking claims to tribunal since July 2013

You shouldn’t always take full course of antibiotics: Experts say taking drugs after you feel well may encourage rise of superbugs

  • Doctors fear taking the drugs after recover could increase antibiotic resistance
  • Once this has happened superbugs evolve and become immune to antibiotics
  • GPs have previously told patients that failing to finish a course is ‘irresponsible’

Kim-ikaze! North Korea threatens to launch new test missile which could hit the USA TODAY to mark 64 years since the end of the Korean war

  • North Korea threatened nuclear strike on US if it tries to take out Kim Jong-Un
  • Was reported by state-run news agency Korean Central News Agency (KCNA)
  • Threat is in response to remarks made by CIA Director Mike Pompeo last week
  • Said Kim Jong-Un needs to be separated from North Korea’s nuclear weapons
  • A North Korean Foreign Minister spokesperson responded to the comments
  • Said to KCNA: ‘We will strike a merciless blow at the heart of the US with our powerful nuclear hammer’ if US attempts to remove Kim Jong-Un

The carers who do not care: From biting and spraying deodorant in the face of dementia patients to stealing their savings, sickening gallery reveals bullies guilty of abusing the elderly

  • Charity Action on Elder Abuse wants law changed so crimes against senior citizens are recognised as aggravated offences
  • It would make them hate crimes, like those with racial or homophobic motives
  • Gallery includes Sandra Lund, 54, of Long Preson, N Yorks, who kicked dementia patient; she was given 12-month community order
  • Fiona Salmon, who weighed 28st, sat on residents at care home in St Ives, Cornwall; she was jailed for nine months

‘Brothel madam, 70, was caught after calling 999 when a customer keeled over and died on the premises’

  • Christy Norman, 70, called the emergency services after a man collapsed
  • Escort girls and a manager fled the scene, leaving Norman to perform CPR
  • She told the police she was a cleaner, then a Girl Friday, but they found she kept financial records

Charlie Gard’s anguished parents concede he must end his days in hospice – yet they STILL cannot agree with doctors how he should be cared for in his last hours

Instagram meltdown as site crashes for US and European users

  • Instagram went down shortly before 2 PM EST
  • The outage affected parts of Europe, São Paulo and the U.S east and west costs
  • Users immediately took to other social media sites to complain

Lloyds Bank to repay £300m to 600,000 customers – around £350 each – over botched mortgage payment collections, heaping pressure on its Portuguese boss

  • Customers have been needlessly charged for 7 years while behind on payments
  • An average refund is likely to be around £350 per person with no forms needed
  • Its the latest scandal for Lloyds, which has set aside £17.4billion for mis-sold PPI
  • Antonio Horta-Osorio stressed importance of ethical banking when he took over
  • The CEO is now likely to face questions as this went on for five years under him

Elderly in ‘free care’ being hit by hidden fees: Thousands of families being charged ‘top ups’ that can exceed £100 a week

  • Age UK research found 48,400 older people in care homes are paying charges
  • Its director, Caroline Abrahams, said they were ‘stealth taxes’ on families
  • The charity said some families are being told to pay the top-up or ‘move out’

Cabinet war over chlorine chicken: Gove vows to block it coming here as part of US trade deal… hours after Fox plays down health fears

  • Gove said there would be no dilution of food standards in Britain after Brexit
  • He said chlorine chicken was an animal welfare issue, not a food safety question
  • The intervention comes after Liam Fox played down the row on his US trip

The end of the speed bump? Councils to be told to REMOVE them from Britain’s streets under plans to slash air pollution

  • Hated speed bumps could be removed by councils under slew of measures
  • The bumps are the scourge of drivers and can slow down emergency vehicles
  • But the government could face a hefty bill for the cost of removing the humps
  • Plan unveiled in package of policies to improve air quality launched by ministers

EU is bad for the poor, Corbyn told dictator pal: Recording shows Labour leader suggesting bloc was a barrier to ‘building socialism’

  • Recording reveals Mr Corbyn discussing EU problems with Nicolas Maduro
  • Labour leader suggested the EU had caused suffering to the people of Europe
  • He suggested the EU was also a barrier to ‘building socialism and the fight against capitalism’

Pictured: 310 pounds of marijuana worth $250,000 hidden in plain sight in the back of a truck crossing the border to Texas

  • The haul was made by on Saturday afternoon by officials at the El Paso border
  • A customs officer spotted something unusual in the pickup truck’s rear wall
  • A drug dog and X-ray machine then revealed the massive haul of drugs
  • They were hidden in a door, the rear walls, and under the pickup’s bed

What North Korea’s elite use the internet for: Researchers find they visit Facebook, watch videos and look at porn sites

  • Intelligence firm Recorded Future monitored North Korean internet activity
  • They found elites often check social media, including Facebook and Instagram
  • And, they read the news, browse Amazon, stream games, and watch porn

Hate crimes against Jewish people soar to record levels: Number of attacks up by 30% on last year as more than 750 are recorded in the first half of 2017

  • 767 anti-Semitic hate crimes in first six months of 2017, 30 per cent rise on 2016
  • It has become the highest figure since statistics were first kept 33 years ago
  • ‘Unprecedented’ run of over 100 incidents each month back to April 2016

Home Secretary Amber Rudd unveils ‘census’ of EU workers in Britain to assess the role they play in the UK’s economy and society

  • It will help ministers devise immigration system that keeps economy buoyant after country takes back control of borders
  • Ms Rudd stressed there would be ‘implementation period’ when Britain leaves Brussels bloc
  • This will ensure there is no ‘cliff edge’ for employers or EU nationals in the UK

Hunk in trunks! How Adam Peaty turned from the little boy who used to be scared of water into the British swimming phenomenon who’s conquered the world

  • Adam Peaty has defended his title as world champion in the 50m breast-stroke
  • As well as being reigning Olympic champion, he hasn’t lost a race for three years
  • Youngest child of a Lidl caretaker and a nursery manager from Staffordshire
  • As an infant, the future world champion was terrified of water and refused baths

The children, men and pregnant woman cast adrift and left to die: Horrifying photos show bodies found in a rubber boat drifting in the Mediterranean in latest migrant disaster

  • Charity rescues 167 migrants alive as 13 die in another operation involving migrants crossing Mediterranean
  • More than 2,200 people have died crossing the stretch this year, meaning an average of more than 10 a day
  • The latest grim salvation mission was 15 miles off the coast of Sabratha in Libya in the Mediterranean Sea
  • As some migrants’ corpses lie naked in the middle of the dinghy, others can be seen waiting to be rescued

 

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Broadcasting House – Decentralizing ‘ Truth’
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Truth Rating

Broadcasting House | NEWS FROM THE LEFT | 2017-07-27

Broadcasting House | NEWS FROM THE LEFT | 2017-07-27

NEWS FROM THE LEFT | 2017-07-27

| Antiobiotics Advice is Wrong | Trump’s non-Transgender Military | Breitbart Turning on Trump? | Poverty – Eat or be Clean? | Legalise Cannabis | Amber Rudd calls for Analysis of EU Migration | Facebook Posts $3.9bn Quarterly Profit | Further Venezuelan Sanctions | Further Russian Sanctions | We’re Stardust!

Rule that patients must finish antibiotics course is wrong, study says

  • Telling patients to stop taking antibiotics when they feel better may be preferable to instructing them to finish the course, according to a group of experts who argue that the rule long embedded in the minds of doctors and the public is wrong and should be overturned.
  • Patients have traditionally been told that they must complete courses of antibiotics, the theory being that taking too few tablets will allow the bacteria causing their disease to mutate and become resistant to the drug.
  • But Martin Llewelyn, a professor in infectious diseases at Brighton and Sussex medical school, and colleagues claim that this is not the case. In an analysis in the British Medical Journal, the experts say “the idea that stopping antibiotic treatment early encourages antibiotic resistance is not supported by evidence, while taking antibiotics for longer than necessary increases the risk of resistance”.
  • There are some diseases where the bug can become resistant if the drugs are not taken for long enough. The most obvious example is tuberculosis, they say. But most of the bacteria that cause people to become ill are found on everybody’s hands in the community, causing no harm, such as E coli and Staphylococcus aureus. People fall ill only when the bug gets into the bloodstream or the gut. The longer such bacteria are exposed to antibiotics, the more likely it is that resistance will develop

Donald Trump says US military will not allow transgender people to serve

  • Donald Trump said on Wednesday he would not allow transgender individuals to serve in the US military in any capacity, reversing a policy put in place by Barack Obama a year ago.
  • The US president tweeted: “After consultation with my generals and military experts, please be advised that the United States government will not accept or allow … transgender individuals to serve in any capacity in the US military.”
  • He added: “Our military must be focused on decisive and overwhelming … victory and cannot be burdened with the tremendous medical costs and disruption that transgender in the military would entail.”
  • Later, Sarah Huckabee Sanders, the White House press secretary, was not able to say if the thousands of currently serving transgender people would be thrown out of the military. She said: “That’s something that the department of defense and the White House will have to work [on] together, as implementation takes place and is done so lawfully.”

Poverty ‘driving people to choose between eating or keeping clean’

  • Growing numbers of people are facing hygiene poverty, where they are unable to afford essential products such as shampoo and deodorant, and are having to choose between eating and keeping clean, a charity has found.
  • A report from In Kind Direct says thousands of people are seeking help and describes the issue as a “hidden crisis”. Last year the charity distributed a record £20.2m of hygiene products, a rise of 67% on £12.1m the year before.
  • Robin Boles, chief executive of In Kind Direct, said: “This is hitting families hard. The fact that last year was our busiest year ever, distributing products to charities and the people they help, highlights the stark choices people are facing.”
  • The study has prompted campaigners to call for the government to do more to alleviate poverty. They say cuts to working benefits coupled with rising inflation have left families struggling.
  • Samantha Stapley, operations manager for England at the Trussell Trust food bank network, described the report as “very concerning”. She added: “When people are referred to food banks with no money for food, they’re often struggling to afford other basic essentials too.”

Trump battle over Obamacare reminds Scaramucci of Lincoln’s fight to abolish slavery

  • The new head of communications at the White House brought up Abraham Lincoln’s struggle to end slavery when asked about the difficulty Donald Trump has faced in trying to repeal Barack Obama’s healthcare legislation.
  • In his first UK television interview, Anthony Scaramucci said Trump would push through the abolition of the healthcare plan, despite opposition in Congress.
  • He told BBC Newsnight’s Emily Maitlis: “If you’ve read Team of Rivals, it took Lincoln three or four times to get what he wanted from the Senate and the House of Representatives, which was the full abolition of slavery – that was a much tougher thing to get done than what we’re working on right now.”

Is Breitbart about to turn on Donald Trump?

  • If anything has been predictable in the chaos of the early Trump presidency, it’s the unstinting support he has received from Breitbart News. Until now.
  • In recent days, Trump has attacked the attorney general, Jeff Sessions, on Twitter and in an interview with the New York Times over his recusal from oversight of the investigation into Trump’s possible Russian connections. As a result, there has been widespread speculation that Trump might fire his attorney general, or that, faced with an untenable position, Sessions might resign.
  • Trump’s public attacks on Sessions seem to be alienating the website that gave him his chief strategist Steve Bannon, and helped him into the White House. And on Tuesday, Breitbart bit back.
  • Adam Shaw skewered Trump’s “hypocrisy” in calling Sessions “weak” on legal moves against Hillary Clinton, reminding readers that Sessions was “one of the vital pillars of Trump’s immigration agenda”. He argued that Sessions has been responsible for “some of the most significant achievements of Trump’s young administration”, such as pushing the “Muslim travel ban” forward, and coming down hard on sanctuary cities

Covering of Grenfell Tower to begin within three weeks

An operation to cover the blackened hulk of Grenfell Tower will begin in the next three weeks and is likely to take until mid-autumn because of its complexity.

Michael Lockwood, who is in charge of site recovery, told a meeting of local residents on Wednesday evening that scaffolding would begin to be erected around the tower in the next two to three weeks and the operation to wrap the tower would take a minimum of 12 weeks.

The wrapping would prevent dust and ash being distributed in the area, Lockwood said. Scaffolding would permit a lift to be installed in the tower, allowing recovered material to be removed.

The stability of the tower had been a “big issue” over the six weeks since the devastating fire in which at least 80 people died, he said. The building comprised a core and four columns, one of which was badly damaged in the fire.

David Lammy urges Grenfell inquiry chair to ‘uncover the truth’

  • David Lammy has written to the chair of the public inquiry into the Grenfell Tower fire to demand a two-stage investigation into the specific causes and circumstances of the blaze and its implications for national policy.
  • The Labour MP has also urged Sir Martin Moore-Bick to appoint an advisory panel of survivors, victims’ families and local residents “to boost confidence and trust in the inquiry”.
  • At a public meeting on the inquiry on Tuesday evening, residents repeatedly told Moore-Bick and his advisers that they did not reflect the local community. “You do not have our confidence, you do not represent us and you do not look like any of us,” said one woman, to cheers and clapping.
  • Since being appointed to chair the inquiry by Theresa May, Moore-Bick has struggled to win the confidence of local people. At Tuesday’s meeting, the retired judge, wearing a pinstripe suit, listened to people’s complaints and suggestions for more than two hours. At times he looked uncomfortable during more heated contributions, although he answered direct questions firmly.

Government’s air quality plan branded inadequate by city leaders

  • The government’s new clean air plan has been branded inadequate by the leaders of eight heavily polluted cities, as campaigners said banning petrol and diesel cars from 2040 would not help the thousands dying each year from illnesses linked to toxic fumes.
  • The long-awaited report was published by Michael Gove, the environment secretary, on Wednesday, after a court ruled last year that the government must improve its proposals for tackling illegal levels of pollution.
  • It confirmed conventional petrol and diesel cars would be banned in 23 years but the government refused to legislate for more “clean air zones” that would charge the dirtiest vehicles to enter some of the UK’s most polluted cities.
  • The plan also stopped short of bringing in a scrappage scheme to encourage people to give up diesel cars, considering only a “targeted” version to incentivise some some groups of people on low incomes or in particularly polluted areas.

Amber Rudd asks for analysis of EU migration – a year after referendum

  • The government is to launch its first major investigation into migration from the EU in order to lay the foundations for a new immigration system, though critics have questioned why the work has begun more than a year after the EU referendum.
  • The home secretary, Amber Rudd, is set to commission the independent Migration Advisory Committee to carry out a detailed analysis of the economic and social contributions and costs of EU citizens in Britain.
  • Announcing the study, Rudd also said the government would seek a transitional arrangement, likely to involve the continuation of free movement, to ensure there would be no “cliff edge” for employers or EU nationals in the country.
  • However, the study will not report back until September 2018 – seven months before Britain is set to formally exit the EU in March 2019.

BBC apologises after Tory donor insults Jeremy Corbyn

  • The BBC has apologised after Jeremy Corbyn was called a “twat” in a Radio 4 interview by Charlie Mullins, the boss of Pimlico Plumbers and a Conservative party donor.
  • Mullins was being interviewed on Radio 4’s World at One when host Martha Kearney asked whether the UK should attempt to remain part of the single market after Brexit.
  • Mullins replied: “Course we should be staying in; Jeremy Corbyn’s a twat, ain’t he?”
  • Kearney then apologised to the Labour leader for the comment, saying: “Well, we’ll definitely leave it there. Apologies to Jeremy Corbyn for the language used.”
  • The Pimlico Plumbers boss was referring to Corbyn’s stance that the UK should leave the single market if it leaves the EU. Corbyn told the BBC’s Andrew Marr Show last weekend that membership of the single market and the EU were “inextricably linked”.

Erdoğan: Israel is harming Jerusalem’s Islamic character

  • The Turkish president, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, has intervened in the continuing crisis surrounding the Jerusalem holy sites by accusing Israel of undermining the city’s “Islamic character”, in comments likely to further inflame regional tensions.
  • The comments by Erdoğan, which came as Muslim leaders called on Palestinians to continue prayers and protests in the city, triggered an immediate tit-for-tat with Israeli officials, who said the accusation was “absurd” and pointed to Turkey’s own human rights record.
  • Protests have been held each evening outside the compound housing Jerusalem’s al-Aqsa mosque after Israel introduced new security measures, which followed the killing of two Israeli police officers at the entrance to the shrine by three Israeli Arabs.
  • Speaking at a conference in Ankara, Erdoğan said: “Israel is harming Jerusalem’s Islamic character … Nobody should expect us to remain silent against the double standards in Jerusalem.” He added that Turkey “cannot tolerate” constraints placed on Muslims visiting the site during prayer

Man Booker prize 2017 longlist led by Arundhati Roy’s return to fiction

  • Twenty years after Arundhati Roy won the Man Booker prize for her debut novel The God of Small Things, the Indian author has been longlisted for the £50,000 award for her second, The Ministry of Utmost Happiness.
  • On a longlist thronged with literary titans, whose combined trophy cabinet would include the Pulitzer, the Costa, the Baileys, the Folio, the Impac and the Goldsmiths prizes, Roy – the only author to have won the Booker before – is listed for her novel about an Indian transgender woman, which judges called a “rich and vital book”. Speaking about why it took her two decades to produce a second novel, Roy told the Guardian earlier this year that “fiction just takes its time. It’s no hurry. I can’t write it faster or slower than I have; it’s like you’re a sedimentary rock that’s just gathering all these layers, and swimming around.”
  • The Man Booker judging panel, picking from more than 150 titles, also went for four writers who have been shortlisted for the UK’s most prestigious literary prize before but not won it. Ali Smith was chosen for the “humane, zany, delightful, optimistic” post-EU referendum novel Autumn; Zadie Smith was picked for her story of the friendship and rivalry between two London girls who meet at a dance class, Swing Time; Sebastian Barry is in the running with Days Without End, about an Irish man who migrates to the US in the lead-up to the civil war; and Mohsin Hamid for Exit West, a love story set in a world where refugees use wormholes to travel from city to city.

We are all made of stars: half our bodies’ atoms ‘formed beyond the Milky Way’

  • Nearly half of the atoms that make up our bodies may have formed beyond the Milky Way and travelled to the solar system on intergalactic winds driven by giant exploding stars, astronomers claim.
  • The dramatic conclusion emerges from computer simulations that reveal how galaxies grow over aeons by absorbing huge amounts of material that is blasted out of neighbouring galaxies when stars explode at the end of their lives.
  • Powerful supernova explosions can fling trillions of tonnes of atoms into space with such ferocity that they escape their home galaxy’s gravitational pull and fall towards larger neighbours in enormous clouds that travel at hundreds of kilometres per second.
  • Astronomers have long known that elements forged in stars can travel from one galaxy to another, but the latest research is the first to reveal that up to half of the material in the Milky Way and similar-sized galaxies can arrive from smaller galactic neighbours.
  • Much of the hydrogen and helium that falls into galaxies forms new stars, while heavier elements, themselves created in stars and dispersed in the violent detonations, become the raw material for building comets and asteroids, planets and life.

Housing market still reeling a decade after financial crisis, Savills says

  • Ten years on the housing market is still feeling the after-effects of the credit crunch, with existing homeowners struggling to trade up, a doubling of typical first-time buyer deposits, and a “huge gap” between London and the rest of Britain, according to a new report.
  • Property company Savills has found that the global financial crisis – which it considers to have started on 9 August 2007, when the French bank BNP Paribas froze three investment funds – is “still shaping the UK housing market” and will continue to cast its shadow over the sector for years to come.
  • In the report, the firm says the property market is “more divided at a regional level than ever before”. Over the past decade, London price growth has been twice that of the south-east and at least four times that of all other regions.
  • The average house price now stands at £478,142 in London, compared with the UK average of £209,971, the report says. By contrast, Wales, Yorkshire and Humberside, and the north-west have only just achieved positive price growth 10 years post-credit crunch, while values in the north-east are typically down 9%, according to the firm’s analysis of data from the Land Registry and other sources.

Legalise cannabis as treatment of last resort for MS, says charity

  • Ten thousand people with multiple sclerosis in the UK should be allowed to use cannabis legally in order to relieve their “relentless and exhausting” symptoms, experts in the disease have told ministers.
  • The MS Society claims the one in 10 sufferers of the condition whose pain and spasticity cannot be treated by medication available on the NHS should be able to take the drug without fear of prosecution.
  • The evidence on cannabis’s effectiveness, while not conclusive, is now strong enough that the government should relax the ban on the drug for MS patients who have no other treatment options, the society says in a report.
  • Doctors who treat MS patients have backed the society’s call, as have the Liberal Democrats and the Green party. Legalisation would ease “the extremely difficult situation in which many people with MS find themselves”, the charity said.
  • The society is calling for the first time for the 10,000 patients – one in 10 of the 100,000 people in Britain with MS – to be able to access cannabis without fear of arrest. It has changed its position after reviewing the evidence, consulting its medical advisers and seeking the views of 3,994 people who have the condition.

Ministers vow to end employment tribunal fees after court defeat

  • The government has been forced into a humiliating overhaul of employment tribunal fees after the supreme court ruled they were inconsistent with access to justice.
  • The highest UK court came down in favour of the trade union Unison, which argued that fees of up to £1,200 were preventing workers – especially those on lower incomes – from getting justice.
  • The decision by a panel of seven justices, headed by the court’s president, Lord Neuberger, came after the union lost in the high court and court of appeal. The action was brought against the then lord chancellor and justice secretary, Liz Truss.
  • The Ministry of Justice said it would take “immediate steps to stop charging fees in employment tribunals and put in place arrangements to refund those who have paid”. Unison said more than £27m of fees needed to be refunded.

Facebook posts $3.89bn quarterly profit, up 71% from last year

  • Facebook has delivered a much higher-than-expected quarterly profit, driven by a sharp increase in sales of mobile video ads, sending its shares to an all-time high.
  • Total revenue rose 44.8% to $9.32bn from the same period in 2016, of which Facebook posted a profit of $3.89bn – up a whopping 71% from the year before.
  • “We had a good second quarter and first half of the year. Our community is now 2 billion people and we’re focusing on bringing the world closer together,” said Facebook’s CEO, Mark Zuckerberg.
  • Mobile ad revenue accounted for 87% of the company’s total advertising revenue of $9.16 billion in the latest quarter, up from 84% a year earlier.
  • The boost came from increasing monetisation of video within the Facebook News Feed, as well as growth in the Facebook-owned Instagram.

Thousands evacuated after wildfire on France’s Mediterranean coast

  • Summer wildfires are once again blazing across southern Europe, forcing the evacuation of 12,000 people on France’s Mediterranean cost and devouring swaths of forests as far afield as Corsica, Portugal, Italy and Albania.
  • Authorities in the Côte d’Azur region decided to move people out of tents, campsites and holiday homes around the hilltop town of Bormes-les-Mimosas after a fire broke out in the surrounding forests on Tuesday.
  • Some of the 12,000 people displaced by the flames sheltered in gymnasiums, village halls and schools while others huddled on local beaches.

Kremlin says new sanctions are sad news for US-Russia relations

  • Proposed new US sanctions against Russia are an extremely unfriendly act and sad news for Russia-US relations, the Kremlin has said.
  • France, Germany and the EU also criticised the sanctions amid concerns that the measures could affect European businesses. Jean-Claude Juncker, the president of the European commission, warned the EU would hit back “within a matter of days” if the sanctions damaged European economic interests.
  • Juncker expressed his fury at the failure of Washington to work with the EU on the issue, saying: “America first cannot mean that Europe’s interests come last.”
  • The House of Representatives voted overwhelmingly in favour of imposing new sanctions on Moscow and requiring Donald Trump to obtain lawmakers’ permission before easing any sanctions on Russia.

Venezuela crisis: US imposes fresh sanctions in effort to stop rewrite of constitution

Poland hits back at EU ‘blackmail’ over judicial reforms

  • Poland’s ruling conservatives have hit back at EU threats to halt the country’s voting rights in the bloc if it pushes through controversial judicial reforms, saying they amount to “blackmail”.
  • The EU warned on Wednesday that it would immediately move to deploy its most serious sanction if Poland’s far-rightwing government gave itself the power to fire its supreme court judges.
  • Frans Timmermans, the first vice-president of the European commission, acknowledged that Poland’s president, Andrzej Duda, had this week stepped in to block two contentious reforms of the judiciary proposed by the ruling Law and Justice party (PiS).
  • The two laws would have forced the resignation of all supreme court justices and allowed their replacements to be selected by the justice minister, and would have would given government-appointed members of the National Council of the Judiciary – which selects judicial candidates – a power of veto

 

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